*|MC:SUBJECT|*
July Newsletter 2018
View this email in your browser

July 2018 Edition

What's New

Arthritis is the leading cause of disability in the United States with one in five (22%) adults in the United States that report having doctor diagnosed arthritis. (CDC)

Healing Rheumatoid Arthritis with Natural Medicine

People living with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) compare the pain and inflammation to a fire raging out of control. RA is a chronic, systemic autoimmune disease causing swelling, stiffness, and pain in the joints. It can result in joint deformity and damage to other organs, including the nerves, heart, and lungs.

Approximately 1.5 million Americans have Rheumatoid Arthritis: most are adults over age 40; about 12,000 children under age 16 have juvenile-onset RA.

Symptoms of RA (aggravated by stress and lack of sleep)

  • Swollen, painful, hot and disfigured joints on both sides of the body
  • Pain, stiffness and limited movement making daily activities difficult
  • Fatigue, muscle aches, and fevers

The prevailing, conventional theory is that inflammation results from an "over-reaction" of the immune system that may include genetic factors. Doctors of natural medicine believe there is a deeper, root cause for this haywire immune system response. They theorize immune dysregulation originates in imbalances that involve a person's genetics, lifestyle choices, nutritional status, gut health, stress, environmental triggers and emotional wellbeing.

Treatment of RA

Conventional treatment includes physical therapy and prescription medicines (steroids, painkillers, and immune suppressors) to treat pain and swelling. While these drugs may be necessary for some people, they have side effects including hair loss, liver damage, stress on the kidneys and heart, and risk for addiction, without correcting the underlying imbalance.

Natural medicine emphasizes identification and treatment of root causes. Holistic doctors use safe, natural therapies and interventions that stimulate the restoration of health without side effects. Here's a sampling of holistic interventions that can make a huge impact in healing the root causes of RA.

An Anti-inflammatory Diet

Commit to a diet that includes: organic fruits and veggies; healthy fats such as olive, avocado, and coconut oils; whole grains; bone broth; wild-caught fish; and nuts/seeds. These foods provide natural antioxidants - cellular superheroes that gobble up the free radical cells that contribute to development of RA. There are many foods that are considered healthy in general, but may cause inflammation for some people, leading to immune dysregulation. Holistic doctors will test for food sensitivities, such as gluten, dairy, egg, or others, and work with a patient to create a diet with healthy alternatives when needed.

Keep Moving

Movement is important for managing symptoms (including pain) and enhancing psychological wellbeing. Low impact exercise, such as cycling, walking, water aerobics and Tai Chi, are ideal. Symptoms can improve with strength training.

R & R: Rest, Relaxation & Pain Reduction

Massage therapy, acupuncture or acupressure, reflexology, yoga, deep breathing, and guided imagery provide protection against painful bouts of RA by helping improve body awareness, reduce muscle tension, enhance sleep, and decrease stress hormones.

Manage Symptoms, Naturally

Nutritional and herbal supplements can help reduce pain and inflammation. Vitamin D deficiency is associated with RA, so supplementing can be important. Extracts of ginger and turmeric, Omega-3 fish oil and digestive enzymes are some nutrients that help tame the fire of inflammation.

A natural medicine approach to healing RA will be unique to each person. Consult with your holistic physician for interventions that will work best for you.

References

Food for Thought. . .

"We see in order to move; we move in order to see." - William Gibson

The Red Bell of the Ball!

Crisp, sweet red bell peppers are versatile and packed with nutrients. They're loaded with the antioxidants Vitamin C and A, which support immunity and help the body fight free radicals - molecules implicated in inflammation and many disease processes. That beautiful red color is attributed to the nutrient lycopene, another antioxidant. Vitamin B6 and folate - nutrients that support red blood cells - are also found in these crimson beauties. Making red bells a regular part of your diet can help protect against chronic illnesses such as heart disease, joint disease, and cancer.

Red bells are actually the fully ripe version of green bell peppers. With the exception of very cold winters, they're available year-round in most places. Choose peppers with deep color, taut skin, and fresh-looking stems. Peppers should be firm and heavy for their size (indicating they are well hydrated). They add flavor to sandwiches, stir-fry, salads, soups, stews, sauces, and are also delicious raw.

You may have heard that peppers are a part of the nightshade family of vegetables and aren't a good food choice for some people. Nightshades (including potatoes, eggplant and tomatoes), are so named because they grow best in shady areas and some bloom at night. For most people, nightshades are a healthy choice, but for others, they can trigger a reaction similar to that seen with soy or dairy. If you're concerned about this, consult a natural medicine practitioner for dietary testing and guidance.

References

Roasted Red Peppers Stuffed with Kale & Rice

Delight friends and family with this perfect summer picnic supper or lunch entree. The crimson flesh of red pepper gives bright contrast to kale's deep green. Chopped onion and minced garlic combine with lemon and herbs to bring an aromatic flavor to the brown rice. Delicious, filling, and vegan friendly, too!

Ingredients

  • 3 medium red bell peppers
  • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • Freshly ground pepper, to taste

Filling:

  • 8 ounces kale, (6 cups lightly packed), trimmed
  • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 1/2 cup chopped red bell pepper
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 3/4 cup cooked short-grain brown rice, (see Tip)
  • 1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese (optional or use preferred substitute)
  • 1/4 cup toasted pine nuts, divided (see Tip)
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • Freshly ground pepper, to taste

Instructions

  1. To prepare peppers: Preheat oven to 400°F. Halve peppers lengthwise through the stems, leaving them attached. Remove the seeds. Lightly brush the peppers outside and inside with oil; sprinkle insides with salt and pepper. Place, cut-side down, in a 9-by-13-inch baking dish. Bake until just tender, 10 to 15 minutes. Let cool slightly. Turn cut-side up.
  2. To prepare filling: Bring 2 cups salted water to a boil in a large wide pan. Stir in kale, cover and cook until tender, 10 to 12 minutes. Drain, rinse under cold water; squeeze dry. Finely chop.
  3. Heat oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium heat. Add onion and chopped bell pepper; cook, stirring often, until onion is golden, 6 to 8 minutes. Add garlic and cook, stirring, for 30 seconds. Stir in the kale. Remove from the heat and let cool slightly. Stir in rice, Parmesan, 2 tablespoons pine nuts and lemon juice. Season with salt and pepper. Divide the filling among the pepper halves. Sprinkle with the remaining 2 tablespoons pine nuts.
  4. Add 2 tablespoons water to the baking dish. Cover the peppers with foil and bake until heated through, 15 to 20 minutes. Uncover and bake for 5 minutes more. Serve hot.

Time Saving Prep Tip: Follow Steps 1, 2 & 3. Cover and refrigerate up to 2 days.

Brown Rice Prep Tip: Place 1 cup brown rice, 2 1/2 cups water and a pinch of salt, if desired, in a medium saucepan; bring to a simmer. Cover; cook over low heat until rice is tender and most of the liquid has been absorbed, 45 to 50 minutes. Makes 3 cups.

For Toasted Pine Nuts: Heat a small dry skillet over medium-low heat. Add pine nuts and cook, stirring constantly, until golden and fragrant, 2 to 3 minutes. (Or spread in a small baking pan and bake at 400°F for about 5 minutes.)

References

Fight Joint Inflammation with Turmeric

Turmeric (Curcuma longa) is the golden-orange spice that gives curried foods pizzazz. In Traditional Chinese and Indian Medicine, turmeric is used to treat allergies, digestive ailments, and pain. The active chemical component of turmeric is curcumin, known for its anti-inflammatory properties. Today, research is focused on the role curcumin plays in diseases where the underlying factor is inflammation, such as in heart disease and arthritis.

Studies show that curcumin blocks inflammation at the cellular level. Some studies indicate that curcumin's role in preventing joint inflammation surpasses its ability to reduce active joint inflammation. In clinical trials, standardized curcumin supplements helped improve pain and swelling in patients with RA. These promising results are being further investigated in long-term studies.

Including turmeric in your diet is easy to do and, oh, so flavorful. Add turmeric to soups and dressings; sprinkle over meats, veggies, and scrambled eggs; add it to plain yogurt or a smoothie.

While adding turmeric spice to your meals is a great first step, the amounts used in cooking do not provide the therapeutic levels needed to achieve its robust health effects. When considering the addition of turmeric to your health plan, work with your holistic health practitioner to determine if this is a good choice and which curcumin supplement is best for you. He or she can recommend the right form (capsule or powder) that will have the best bioavailability - meaning it's easy for your body to process through the digestive tract - for your specific health needs.

References

The Anti-inflammatory Power of Cat's Claw

Native to the Amazon rainforest, Cat's Claw (Uncaria tomentosa) gets its name from the inch-long hooked thorns that allow this tropical climbing plant to anchor itself to trees and wind its way up 100 feet or more into the forest canopy. As they have for centuries, indigenous people and herbalists use the roots, leaves, and bark in preparations for asthmas, arthritis, rheumatism, urinary and kidney problems, and inflammation. In modern herbal medicine, Cat's Claw is recommended for chronic illnesses such as fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue, mononucleosis, and arthritis.

A potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory botanical, Cat's Claw is used to treat joint problems that occur with osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. In a small clinical trial, Cat's Claw was shown to decrease pain in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, as well as osteoarthritis of the knee. The medicinal benefits of Cat's Claw come from chemicals called pentacyclic oxindole alkaloids, which boost the immune system and help temper inflammation.

The concentration of medicinally active chemicals in Cat's Claw vary based on when and how the plant is harvested. A holistic health physician will be knowledgeable about a product's purity and potency, as well as which form of Cat's Claw supplement is best for you. For example, your physician may suggest tea, tincture, extract or capsule depending upon your health concerns. Some people experience upset stomach, headache or dizziness when using Cat's Claw. Also, it is not recommended for women who are pregnant or nursing, or for children under age three.

References

Guiding Principles

The information offered by this newsletter is presented for educational purposes. Nothing contained within should be construed as nor is intended to be used for medical diagnosis or treatment. This information should not be used in place of the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider. Always consult with your physician or other qualified health care provider before embarking on a new treatment, diet or fitness program. You should never disregard medical advice or delay in seeking it because of any information contained within this newsletter.
How can you enhance the anti-inflammatory effects of Tumeric? 

Get it as an IV!! 

Injecting Curcumin (the active ingredient of turmeric) directly into the bloodstream bypassses the gut and dramatically improves its absorption.  
Our Curcumin IV's are safe and effective at decreasing inflammation and pain.


Mention our newsletter and get 10% off our curcumin IV in the month of July!!!
Share
Tweet
Forward
+1
Copyright © 2018 Serene Natural Health, All rights reserved.

Our mailing address is:
Serene Natural Health
7500 212th St SW Ste 212
Edmonds, WA 98026
425.689.7007 phone
www.serenenaturalhealth.net

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.






This email was sent to *|EMAIL|*
why did I get this?    unsubscribe from this list    update subscription preferences
*|LIST:ADDRESSLINE|*

*|REWARDS|*